FeedBurner is a web feed management provider launched in 2004.[1] It provides custom RSS feeds and management tools for bloggers, podcasters, and other web-based content publishers. Google acquired FeedBurner in 2007.

FeedBurner was founded by Dick Costolo, Eric Lunt, Steve Olechowski, and Matt Shobe. The four founders were consultants together at Andersen Consulting (now Accenture).[1] Costolo went on to serve as chief executive officer of Twitter from 2010 to 2015.

Services

Services provided to publishers include traffic analysis[2] and an optional advertising system. Though it initially was not clear whether advertising would be well-suited to the RSS format,[3] authors now choose to include advertising in two-thirds of FeedBurner’s feeds.[4] Users can find out how many people have subscribed to their feeds and with what service/program they subscribed.

Published feeds are modified in several ways, including automatic links to Digg and del.icio.us, and “splicing” information from multiple feeds.[5] FeedBurner is a typical Web 2.0 service, providing web service application programming interfaces (APIs) to allow other software to interact with it. As of October 5, 2007, FeedBurner hosted over a million feeds for 584,832 publishers, including 142,534 podcast and videocast feeds.[6]

History

On June 3, 2007, FeedBurner was acquired by Google Inc., for a rumored price of $100 million.[7] One month later, two of their popular “Pro” services (MyBrand and TotalStats) were made free to all users.[8]

On May 26, 2011, Google announced that the FeedBurner APIs were deprecated.[9] Google shut down the APIs on October 20, 2012.[10]

Google “retired” AdSense for Feeds on October 2, 2012 and shut it down on December 3, 2012.[11]

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